Seminar für Englische Philologie

Dr. Christine Voth

Curriculum Vitae



Christine completed her doctorate in the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic at the University of Cambridge (2014), where she was an occasional lecturer in Palaeography and Codicology and Old English, and supervisor in Palaeography and Codicology, Old English and Anglo-Saxon History. She holds masters degrees in Medieval History (King's College, 2008) and Socio-Linguistics (University of Texas, 1999). Her research interests focus on all aspects of the production and use of medieval manuscripts in the Insular World (England, Ireland and Wales before c. 850) and Anglo-Saxon England and Wales (after c.850). This includes analysis of the hands of the manuscripts (palaeography), how books were constructed (codicology), evidence of reader interaction with extant manuscripts (and their exemplars), and evidence for language change. In addition, her research includes analysis of the changing nature of textual communities in England from the late-ninth century through the eleventh. She is also interested in the importation of Brittonic (Welsh and Cornish) manuscripts into England in the ninth through eleventh centuries, and their subsequent influence on Anglo-Saxon book culture.



Publications



  • with Debby Banham. Bald’s Leechbook and Leechbook III: Old English Medicine in British Library, Royal 12. D. xvii. Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library (Forthcoming, Fall 2018).

  • ‘Women and “Women’s Medicine” in Anglo-Saxon England: from Text to Practice’ in Feminist Approaches to Anglo-Saxon Studies, ed. R. Trilling, R. Norris and R. Stephenson (Forthcoming).

  • ‘Remedies against the Devil and Dementia’, History Today, October 2017 [online here]

  • 'Irish pilgrims, Welsh manuscripts and Anglo-Saxon Monasteries: Was script change in tenth-century England a legacy of the Celtic World' Select Proceeds from the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists, Dublin 2013 (Forthcoming).

  • ‘What lies beneath? The application of digital technology to uncover writing obscured by a chemical reagent’, Kodikologie und Paläographie im digitalen Zeitalter 3/Codicology and Palaeography in the Digital Age 3 (Norderstedt, 2015), pp. 47–64.

  • with Debby Banham. ‘The diagnosis and treatment of wounds in the Old English medical collections: Anglo-Saxon surgery?’, Wounds and Wound Repair in Medieval Culture, ed. K. DeVries and L. Tracey (Leiden, 2015), pp. 153–74.

  • 'Biblical Parallels in Alfredian Law and the Early Compilation of Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 173'. QUAESTIO: Selected Proceedings of the Cambridge Colloquium in Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic (2011), pp. 149–72.