tropical deforestation
Conversion of lowland tropical forests to tree cash crop plantations loses up to one-half of stored soil organic carbon. (www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1504628112)


Amanda L. Matson
Amanda L. Matson receives the Göttinger Preis Waldökosystemforschung for 2015. This award distinguishes excellent works of young researchers in the field of Forest Ecology. This prize is founded by Prof. Dr. Bernhard Ulrich and is given through the Forest Ecosystem Research unit of the Center of Biodiversity and Sustainable Land Use at the Georg-August University of Göttingen. Dr. Matson conceptualized her own research ideas, got them funded, carried out the work in challenging ecosystems, came back from the field to the university setting to write them up, and got them published in well-known international journals. She has gotten her own PhD research funding through a highly competitive research grant by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Her PhD research focused on the biogeochemistry of tropical canopy soils, a field that only very few are working on, and she is the first to quantify rates of nutrient cycling processes (i.e. soil-N cycling and greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes) in arboreal soils of tropical forests. Her PhD research addressed an important global change issue on how elevated N and P deposition, presently occurring in the tropics due to human activities, influences N cycling in and GHG fluxes from canopy soils of Andean forests in Ecuador. Her work provided evidence of the N paradox hypothesis, particularly on whether canopy soil's N cycling and GHG fluxes are decoupled from the forest floor. Her work generated the first evidence that canopy soils are not decoupled from changes in nutrient availability in the forest floor. Her PhD research was supervised by M.D. Corre and E. Veldkamp.


Amanda Matson climbing
Amanda L. Matson received the 'Maria Sibylla Merian Award' for the first place in 'Best Presentations Talk category' during the '2013 Annual Conference of the Society for Tropical Ecology (GTÖ): Tropical organisms and ecosystems in a changing world' held in Vienna, Austria on April 2-5, 2013. Her presentation was titled 'Nitrogen-cycling response to elevated nutrient inputs in canopy soils of Ecuadorian montane forests'.


oil palm plantation
Geographic bias of field observations of soil carbon stocks with tropical land-use changes precludes spatial extrapolation
(www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1016774108)




Bromeliads
Bromeliads as cryptic wetlands in tropical forests
see also




Birgit Ileaps
Birgit Köhler receives the ‘Göttinger Preis Waldökosystemforschung’ for 2011. This award distinguishes excellent works of young researchers in the field of Forest Ecology.
This prize is founded by Prof. Dr. Bernhard Ulrich and is given through the Forest Ecosystem Research unit of the Center of Biodiversity and Sustainable Land Use at the Georg-August University of Göttingen. As Prof. Ulrich pioneered the awareness of deleterious effects of high atmospheric acid and N deposition on forests in Germany and laid the ground work for mitigation policy, such awareness of an important global change process has brought the PhD research of Birgit Köhler to Panama. Her research generated one of the leading information on the impact of projected increase in N deposition on trace gas fluxes in forest soils of the tropics.
Her PhD research is summarized in this article: ´Soil nitrogen oxide and carbon dioxide emissions from a tropical lowland and montane forest exposed to elevated nitrogen input´, and is part of the NITROF project, funded by the Robert Bosch Foundation, and was under the supervision of M.D. Corre and E. Veldkamp.