Programme

Thursday, 9 July 2020

9:00–9:30

Welcome and Introduction

Derivation or Separation?

Non-Derivational Readings of Kant’s Legal Philosophy

9:30–10:45

Christoph Horn (Bonn): Legal and Political Normativity in Kant: Beyond Derivation and Separation

(open for commentary)

10:45–11:00

– coffee break –

11:00-12:15

Marcus Willaschek (Frankfurt): Kant on Moral Universality and the Normative Foundations of Right

(open for commentary)

12:15–14:00

– lunch break –

Derivational Readings of Kant’s Legal Philosophy

14:00–15:15

Paul Guyer (Providence): The Morality of Right. A Restatement

(open for commentary)

15:30–16:45

Bernd Ludwig (Göttingen): The Direct Route from the Categorical Imperative to the General Principle of Right

(open for commentary)

16:45–17:15

– coffee break –


Tensions and Tangencies Between Right and Morality in Kant

Sanctions and Coercion – A Problem for a Derivational Reading?

17:15–18:30

Philipp-Alexander Hirsch (Göttingen): Legal Coercion as a Moral Problem? Kant on the Enforcement of Rights and the Limits of Autonomy

(open for commentary)

19:00

– dinner –

Friday, 10 July 2020

9:30–10:45

Kate Moran & Jens Timmermann (Boston / St. Andrews): Should Criminals Be Punished for Their Folly? On the Ethical Foundations of Kant’s Legal Philosophy

10:45–11:00

– coffee break –

Acting in the Grey Zone of Law and Morality

11:00–12:15

Ralf Bader (Oxford): Morality, Legality, and Luck

12:15–14:00

– lunch break –

14:00–15:15

Martin Brecher (Mannheim): Wrong, but Permitted? Kant’s Notion of Permissive Law

(open for commentary)

15:30–16:45

Arthur Ripstein (Toronto): Two Types of Wrongdoing

16:45–17:15

– coffee break –


Systematic Potentials and Limits

Law and Morality in the Political Domain

17:15–18:30

Katrin Flikschuh (London): Exactitude and Indemonstrability in Kant's Doctrine of Right: On the Limits of Kant’s Legal Philosophy

(open for commentary)

19:00

– dinner –

Saturday, 11 July 2020

9:30–10:45

Alice Pinheiro Walla (Bayreuth): Bridging the Gap: Ethical and Juridical Duties in Case of Lacking Political Institutions

(open for commentary)

10:45–11:00

– coffee break –                                         

What Freedom Is Required for Law?

11:00–12:15

George Pavlakos (Glasgow): (The Morality of) External Freedom: Relational, Non-Coercive and Fundamental

(open for commentary)

12:15–14:00

– lunch break –

14:00–15:15

Japa Pallikkathayil (Pittsburgh): What is External Freedom?

(open for commentary)

15:15–15:45

– coffee break –

15:45–17:00

James P. Messina (New Orleans): Two Conceptions of Freedom in Kant’s Political Philosophy

(open for commentary)

17:00

Closing Remarks