CRC Junior Research Group "Evolution of Cooperation and Prosocial Behaviour"
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Dr. Yvan Russell


Main scientific interests / Working areas

  • Reputation and cooperation

  • Social Cognition from an evolutionary perspective

  • Cognitive evolution (including archaeological approaches)

  • Social networks in primates and humans

  • Psychology of Expertise (Cognitive Psychology)

  • Comparative Psychology

  • Research Methodology

  • Cognitive Science of Religion

  • Semantic Network Analysis



Academic Biography

  • Since 05/2012 Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Courant Research Center Evolution of Social Behaviour, University of Göttingen, Germany.

  • Since 10/2010 Associate Lecturer, The Open University, UK, teaching Introductory and Cognitive Psychology (currently on leave of absence).

  • Since 10/2010 Postdoctoral Associate, Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford, UK.

  • 10/2009-10/2010 Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Centre for Anthropology and Mind, University of Oxford, UK.

  • 11/2009-12/2009 Temporary Lecturer, for MSc. Evolutionary Psychology, Department of Psychology, Brunel University, UK (taught primate evolution and human evolution classes).

  • 10/2007-10/2009 Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Psychology, Brunel University, UK (currently a visiting researcher at Brunel since 10/2009).

  • 02/2008 Visiting Research Fellow, Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, USA.

  • 09/2007-01/2008 Visiting Research Fellow, Institute of Cognition and Culture, Queens University Belfast, UK

  • 07/2007 PhD, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK. Supervisor Prof. Robin Dunbar. Thesis: Reputations and Polyadic Interactions Among Great Apes.

  • 05/2004-12/2004 (5 months), visiting PhD student, Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany.

  • 12/1999 MA Cognitive Evolution (distinction), Department of Archæology, University of Reading, UK. Supervisor Prof. Steven Mithen. Thesis: Lithic Expertise and a Debitage Recognition Task.

  • 10/1996 BA (Advanced) Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Canada. Supervisor for independent research project Prof. Linda M. Wilson.



Theses

  • Russell, Y. I. (1999). Lithic expertise and a debitage recognition task. MA thesis, University of Reading.

  • Russell, Y. I. (2007). Reputations and Polyadic Interactions Among Great Apes. PhD thesis, University of Liverpool.


Publications

  • Russell, Y. I., & Gobet, F. (2012). Sinuosity and the Affect Grid: A method for adjusting repeated mood scores. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 114, 125-136. PDF

  • Russell, Y. I. (2011). Prehistoric stone tools, chess expertise, and cognitive evolution: an experiment about recognizing features in flint debitage. Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, 9, 249-269. PDF

  • Russell, Y. I., Dunbar, R. I. M, & Gobet, F. (2011). Euphoria versus dysphoria: differential cognitive roles in religion? In Masmoudi, S., Naceur, A., & Dai, D. Y. (Eds.). Attention, Representation & Performance: Integration of Cognition, Emotion & Motivation (pp. 147-165). New York: Psychology Press. PDF

  • Russell, Y. I. (2010). Third party grooming in a captive chimpanzee group. Primates, 51, 78-82. PDF

  • Russell, Y. I., Call, J., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2008). Image scoring in great apes. Behavioural Processes, 78, 108-111. PDF

  • Semmann, D., Capelle, T., & Russell, Y. I. (forthcoming). A rabbit’s tail: Lateral movement with a conspicuous rump patch causes predator confusion.

  • Russell, Y.I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (forthcoming). The effect of mood and expertise on solving a ritual-like problem: an application to religious systems.

  • Russell, Y. I., Emmons, N. A., Bjorklund, D. F., Kiessling, F., Whitehouse, H., & Gobet, F. (forthcoming) Supernatural agents move and think, but they do not see through walls.

  • Russell, Y. I., Murzac, A., Gobet, F., Atkinson, A. R., & Whitehouse, H. (forthcoming). Semantic network analysis of religious pamphlets.

  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (forthcoming) Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts.

  • Russell, Y. I., & Gobet, F. (forthcoming). What is counterintuitive? Religious cognition and natural expectation.

  • Russell, Y. I., Dunbar, R. I. M., & Gobet, F. (forthcoming). The natural history of social monitoring by reputation.



Essex Chimpanzee Project (2011-present):

  • Phelps, S. and others (forthcoming). Measuring direct reciprocity of grooming over heterogeneous timescales in a captive chimpanzee group.

  • Phelps, S. and others (forthcoming). Clustering in chimpanzee grooming networks via reciprocity”

  • Hunter, D. K., and others (forthcoming). Dynamics and social network structure of grooming in primates.

  • Musolesi, M., Musial, K. and others (forthcoming). Indirect reciprocity in chimpanzees: motif analysis of grooming patterns.


Some other projects are not listed here. Please contact me if you wish to collaborate.

Conferences & Workshops
Oral papers

  • Russell, Y. I. (2012). Apes do not have religion. Invited talk. Courant Research Center, Evolution of Social Behaviour. University of Göttingen, Germany. April 2, 2012.

  • Russell, Y. I. (2010). How do we acquire religion? Summary of all psychological studies conducted 2007 – 2010. Religion: A Human Phenomenon. XXth World Congress of the International Association of the History of Religions (IAHR). University of Toronto, Canada. August 17, 2010.

  • Russell, Y. I. &, Kiessling, F. (2010). Developmental trajectory of understanding plants, animals, humanoids, supernatural agents, and invisibility. Centre for Anthropology and Mind Seminar Series. University of Oxford, UK. May 8, 2010.

  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). The effects of mood on game learning and analogical transfer in a disguised Tower of Hanoi task. Cognition, Emotion, and Motivation (CEM 09) International Congress. Medina Convention & Expo Centre, Yasmine Hammamet, Tunisia, Nov 4, 2009

  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts. Society for the Scientific Study of Religion (SSSR) Annual Meeting, Denver, USA, Oct 24, 2009.

  • Kiessling, F., Russell, Y, & Perner, J. (2009). Does Peter see the Gozie? Does the Gozie see Peter? Children’s understanding of invisibility: The case of invisible agents. Society for the Scientific Study of Religion (SSSR) Annual Meeting, Denver, USA, Oct 23, 2009.

  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts. British Psychological Society (BPS) Cognitive Section Annual Conference 2009, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, U.K. Sept 2, 2009

  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts. EXREL second project conference. Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford, UK. August 18, 2009

  • Russell, Y. I., Bjorklund, D. F., Gobet, F., Kiessling, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Developmental trajectory of understanding plants, animals, humanoids, supernatural agents, and invisibility. EXREL second project conference. Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford, Oxford. August 18, 2009.

  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). The effects of mood on game learning and analogical transfer in a disguised Tower of Hanoi task. EXREL second project conference. Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford. August 18, 2009.

  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts, Second Brunel Psychology Conference. Department of Psychology, Brunel University, UK. April 30, 2009.

  • Russell, Y. I. (2008) Memory, expertise, and religion. EXREL first project conference, Centre for Religion and Cognition, University of Groningen, Netherlands, February 2, 2008.

  • Russell, Y. I. (2007). Memory, expertise, and religion EXREL first project workshop, Faculty of Theology, University of Aarhus, Denmark, September 18, 2007.

  • Russell, Y. I. (2007). Reputation among great apes. Department of Psychology, University of St. Andrews, Scotland. May 1, 2007.

  • Russell, Y. I. (2007). Reputation among great apes. Round Table Seminar Series, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Liverpool, UK. February 12, 2007.

  • Russell, Y. I. (2005). Image scoring in great apes “Understanding Human Altruism” Workshop, University of Sussex, UK. October 11, 2005.

  • Russell, Y. I. (2005). Image scoring in great apes. Population and Evolutionary Biology (PEB) Annual Colloquium, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, September 30, 2005.

  • Russell, Y. I., Call, J., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2005). An ‘indirect reputation’ experiment in four great ape species. 1st Congress of the European Federation for Primatology (EFP), Göttingen, Germany. August 11, 2005. Winner First prize, Folia Primatologica Young Scientist Award.

  • Russell, Y. I., Call, J., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2005). An ‘indirect reputation’ experiment in four great ape species. Primate Society of Great Britain (PSGB) spring meeting, University of Chester. March 23, 2005. Winner, best student talk.

  • Russell, Y. I. (2004). Social grooming decisions in a captive chimpanzee group (Pantroglodytes). Population and Evolutionary Biology (PEB) Annual Colloquium, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK. June 29, 2004



Conference Posters

  • Russell, Y. I. (2011). Using fuzzy set theory to investigate polyadic grooming relationships among captive chimpanzees. Primate Society of Great Britain Spring Meeting. University of Liverpool, UK. April 27-28, 2011

  • Russell, Y. I., Bjorklund, D. F., Gobet, F., Kiessling, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2010). Developmental trajectory of understanding plants, animals, humanoids, supernatural agents, and invisibility. Religion: A Human Phenomenon. XXth World Congress of the International Association of the History of Religions (IAHR). University of Toronto, Canada. August 16-21, 2010.

  • Russell, Y. I., Murzac, A., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2010). Semantic network analysis of religious pamphlets. Religion: A Human Phenomenon. XXth World Congress of the International Association of the History of Religions (IAHR). University of Toronto, Canada. August 16-21, 2010.

  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2010). Mood, expertise, and analogy: implications for religious transmission. Religion: A Human Phenomenon. XXth World Congress of the International Association of the History of Religions (IAHR). University of Toronto, Canada. August 16-21, 2010.

  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts. Religion: A Human Phenomenon. XXth World Congress of the International Association of the History of Religions (IAHR). University of Toronto, Canada. August 16-21, 2010.

  • Russell, Y. I., Bjorklund, D. F., Gobet, F., Kiessling, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2010). Developmental trajectory of understanding plants, animals, humanoids, supernatural agents, and invisibility. 2010 Annual Convention of the Canadian Psychological Association, Winnipeg, Canada, June 3–5, 2010.

  • Russell, Y. I. (2010). Social monitoring by reputation: how to compare humans and animals in an evolutionary framework? Primate Society of Great Britain (PSGB) spring meeting, University of Abertay, Dundee, Scotland. April 6–7, 2010.

  • Russell, Y. I., & Gobet, F. (2009). The Affect Grid: methodological and measurement issues of measuring mood repeatedly in the same session. Cognition, Emotion, and Motivation (CEM 09) International Congress. Medina Convention & Expo Centre, Yasmine Hammamet, Tunisia, Nov 3–5, 2009.

  • Kiessling, F., Russell, Y, & Perner, J. (2009). Children’s understanding of invisible agents: Absent, small, or ... invisible ?! Biennial Meeting of the Cognitive Development Society (CDS), San Antonio, Texas, USA, October 16, 2009.

  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts. Experimental Analysis of Behaviour Group (EABG) Meeting. Department of Psychology, University College London. April 7, 2009.

  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2008). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts. Recollection Workshop, Institute of Psychology, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, December 18, 2008.

  • Russell, Y. I., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2008). Complexity in chimpanzee grooming cliques: Complex thoughts or simple rules?. International Primatological Society (IPS) XXII Congress, Edinburgh International Convention Centre, Scotland. August 6, 2008

  • Russell, Y. I. (2007). Polyadic grooming among captive chimpanzees.Conference: “Social Organization and Cognitive Tools. General Patterns in Vertebrates?" Konrad Lorenz Forschungsstelle, Grünau, Austria, February 22-25, 2007.

  • Russell, Y. I., Call, J., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2005) An ‘indirect reputation’ experiment in four great ape species. ASAB (Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour) Summer Conference, Lancaster University, Lancaster, U.K., July 19-21, 2005.

  • Russell, Y. I., Call, J., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2005) An ‘indirect reputation’ experiment in four great ape species. St Andrews International Conference on Animal Social Learning, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Scotland, June 15-18, 2005.

  • Russell, Y. I. (2004). Third party grooming in a captive chimpanzee group. Primate Society of Great Britain (PSGB) spring meeting, Paignton Zoo, Paignton, U.K., March 29-30, 2004.

  • Ramcharan, L., Russell, Y., Dueck, A., & Wilson, L. (1997). Sweet taste preference in genetically obese mice. Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Science Annual Meeting. University of Manitoba, June 20, 1997. Winnipeg, Canada.

  • Russell, Y. I. (1997) Sweet taste preference in the genetically obese (lepob/lepob) mouse as an indication of altered hedonic response to ingesta. Prairie Undergraduate Conference. University of Winnipeg, April 1997. Winnipeg, Canada.







Yvan Russell

Dr. Yvan Russell

Postdoc
Courant Research Center Evolution of Social Behavior
Research Group Evolution of Cooperation and Prosocial Behavior
University of Göttingen
Kellnerweg 6 - Room 2.102
37077 Göttingen
Germany

Phone: +49 (0) 551 3914682
E-Mail: yrussel@gwdg.de