CRC Junior Research Group "Evolution of Cooperation and Prosocial Behaviour"

Dr. Yvan Russell

Main scientific interests / Working areas

  • Reputation and cooperation
  • Social Cognition from an evolutionary perspective
  • Cognitive evolution (including archaeological approaches)
  • Social networks in primates and humans
  • Psychology of Expertise (Cognitive Psychology)
  • Comparative Psychology
  • Research Methodology
  • Cognitive Science of Religion
  • Semantic Network Analysis



Academic Biography

  • Since 05/2012 Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Courant Research Center Evolution of Social Behaviour, University of Göttingen, Germany.
  • Since 10/2010 Associate Lecturer, The Open University, UK, teaching Introductory and Cognitive Psychology (currently on leave of absence).
  • Since 10/2010 Postdoctoral Associate, Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford, UK.
  • 10/2009-10/2010 Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Centre for Anthropology and Mind, University of Oxford, UK.
  • 11/2009-12/2009 Temporary Lecturer, for MSc. Evolutionary Psychology, Department of Psychology, Brunel University, UK (taught primate evolution and human evolution classes).
  • 10/2007-10/2009 Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Psychology, Brunel University, UK (currently a visiting researcher at Brunel since 10/2009).
  • 02/2008 Visiting Research Fellow, Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, USA.
  • 09/2007-01/2008 Visiting Research Fellow, Institute of Cognition and Culture, Queens University Belfast, UK
  • 07/2007 PhD, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK. Supervisor Prof. Robin Dunbar. Thesis: Reputations and Polyadic Interactions Among Great Apes.
  • 05/2004-12/2004 (5 months), visiting PhD student, Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany.
  • 12/1999 MA Cognitive Evolution (distinction), Department of Archæology, University of Reading, UK. Supervisor Prof. Steven Mithen. Thesis: Lithic Expertise and a Debitage Recognition Task.
  • 10/1996 BA (Advanced) Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Canada. Supervisor for independent research project Prof. Linda M. Wilson.



Theses

  • Russell, Y. I. (1999). Lithic expertise and a debitage recognition task. MA thesis, University of Reading.
  • Russell, Y. I. (2007). Reputations and Polyadic Interactions Among Great Apes. PhD thesis, University of Liverpool.


Publications

  • Russell, Y. I., & Gobet, F. (2012). Sinuosity and the Affect Grid: A method for adjusting repeated mood scores. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 114, 125-136. PDF
  • Russell, Y. I. (2011). Prehistoric stone tools, chess expertise, and cognitive evolution: an experiment about recognizing features in flint debitage. Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, 9, 249-269. PDF
  • Russell, Y. I., Dunbar, R. I. M, & Gobet, F. (2011). Euphoria versus dysphoria: differential cognitive roles in religion? In Masmoudi, S., Naceur, A., & Dai, D. Y. (Eds.). Attention, Representation & Performance: Integration of Cognition, Emotion & Motivation (pp. 147-165). New York: Psychology Press. PDF
  • Russell, Y. I. (2010). Third party grooming in a captive chimpanzee group. Primates, 51, 78-82. PDF
  • Russell, Y. I., Call, J., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2008). Image scoring in great apes. Behavioural Processes, 78, 108-111. PDF
  • Semmann, D., Capelle, T., & Russell, Y. I. (forthcoming). A rabbit’s tail: Lateral movement with a conspicuous rump patch causes predator confusion.
  • Russell, Y.I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (forthcoming). The effect of mood and expertise on solving a ritual-like problem: an application to religious systems.
  • Russell, Y. I., Emmons, N. A., Bjorklund, D. F., Kiessling, F., Whitehouse, H., & Gobet, F. (forthcoming) Supernatural agents move and think, but they do not see through walls.
  • Russell, Y. I., Murzac, A., Gobet, F., Atkinson, A. R., & Whitehouse, H. (forthcoming). Semantic network analysis of religious pamphlets.
  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (forthcoming) Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts.
  • Russell, Y. I., & Gobet, F. (forthcoming). What is counterintuitive? Religious cognition and natural expectation.
  • Russell, Y. I., Dunbar, R. I. M., & Gobet, F. (forthcoming). The natural history of social monitoring by reputation.



Essex Chimpanzee Project (2011-present):

  • Phelps, S. and others (forthcoming). Measuring direct reciprocity of grooming over heterogeneous timescales in a captive chimpanzee group.
  • Phelps, S. and others (forthcoming). Clustering in chimpanzee grooming networks via reciprocity”
  • Hunter, D. K., and others (forthcoming). Dynamics and social network structure of grooming in primates.
  • Musolesi, M., Musial, K. and others (forthcoming). Indirect reciprocity in chimpanzees: motif analysis of grooming patterns.


Some other projects are not listed here. Please contact me if you wish to collaborate.

Conferences & Workshops
Oral papers

  • Russell, Y. I. (2012). Apes do not have religion. Invited talk. Courant Research Center, Evolution of Social Behaviour. University of Göttingen, Germany. April 2, 2012.
  • Russell, Y. I. (2010). How do we acquire religion? Summary of all psychological studies conducted 2007 – 2010. Religion: A Human Phenomenon. XXth World Congress of the International Association of the History of Religions (IAHR). University of Toronto, Canada. August 17, 2010.
  • Russell, Y. I. &, Kiessling, F. (2010). Developmental trajectory of understanding plants, animals, humanoids, supernatural agents, and invisibility. Centre for Anthropology and Mind Seminar Series. University of Oxford, UK. May 8, 2010.
  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). The effects of mood on game learning and analogical transfer in a disguised Tower of Hanoi task. Cognition, Emotion, and Motivation (CEM 09) International Congress. Medina Convention & Expo Centre, Yasmine Hammamet, Tunisia, Nov 4, 2009
  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts. Society for the Scientific Study of Religion (SSSR) Annual Meeting, Denver, USA, Oct 24, 2009.
  • Kiessling, F., Russell, Y, & Perner, J. (2009). Does Peter see the Gozie? Does the Gozie see Peter? Children’s understanding of invisibility: The case of invisible agents. Society for the Scientific Study of Religion (SSSR) Annual Meeting, Denver, USA, Oct 23, 2009.
  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts. British Psychological Society (BPS) Cognitive Section Annual Conference 2009, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, U.K. Sept 2, 2009
  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts. EXREL second project conference. Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford, UK. August 18, 2009
  • Russell, Y. I., Bjorklund, D. F., Gobet, F., Kiessling, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Developmental trajectory of understanding plants, animals, humanoids, supernatural agents, and invisibility. EXREL second project conference. Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford, Oxford. August 18, 2009.
  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). The effects of mood on game learning and analogical transfer in a disguised Tower of Hanoi task. EXREL second project conference. Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford. August 18, 2009.
  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts, Second Brunel Psychology Conference. Department of Psychology, Brunel University, UK. April 30, 2009.
  • Russell, Y. I. (2008) Memory, expertise, and religion. EXREL first project conference, Centre for Religion and Cognition, University of Groningen, Netherlands, February 2, 2008.
  • Russell, Y. I. (2007). Memory, expertise, and religion EXREL first project workshop, Faculty of Theology, University of Aarhus, Denmark, September 18, 2007.
  • Russell, Y. I. (2007). Reputation among great apes. Department of Psychology, University of St. Andrews, Scotland. May 1, 2007.
  • Russell, Y. I. (2007). Reputation among great apes. Round Table Seminar Series, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Liverpool, UK. February 12, 2007.
  • Russell, Y. I. (2005). Image scoring in great apes “Understanding Human Altruism” Workshop, University of Sussex, UK. October 11, 2005.
  • Russell, Y. I. (2005). Image scoring in great apes. Population and Evolutionary Biology (PEB) Annual Colloquium, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, September 30, 2005.
  • Russell, Y. I., Call, J., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2005). An ‘indirect reputation’ experiment in four great ape species. 1st Congress of the European Federation for Primatology (EFP), Göttingen, Germany. August 11, 2005. Winner First prize, Folia Primatologica Young Scientist Award.
  • Russell, Y. I., Call, J., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2005). An ‘indirect reputation’ experiment in four great ape species. Primate Society of Great Britain (PSGB) spring meeting, University of Chester. March 23, 2005. Winner, best student talk.
  • Russell, Y. I. (2004). Social grooming decisions in a captive chimpanzee group (Pantroglodytes). Population and Evolutionary Biology (PEB) Annual Colloquium, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK. June 29, 2004



Conference Posters

  • Russell, Y. I. (2011). Using fuzzy set theory to investigate polyadic grooming relationships among captive chimpanzees. Primate Society of Great Britain Spring Meeting. University of Liverpool, UK. April 27-28, 2011
  • Russell, Y. I., Bjorklund, D. F., Gobet, F., Kiessling, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2010). Developmental trajectory of understanding plants, animals, humanoids, supernatural agents, and invisibility. Religion: A Human Phenomenon. XXth World Congress of the International Association of the History of Religions (IAHR). University of Toronto, Canada. August 16-21, 2010.
  • Russell, Y. I., Murzac, A., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2010). Semantic network analysis of religious pamphlets. Religion: A Human Phenomenon. XXth World Congress of the International Association of the History of Religions (IAHR). University of Toronto, Canada. August 16-21, 2010.
  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2010). Mood, expertise, and analogy: implications for religious transmission. Religion: A Human Phenomenon. XXth World Congress of the International Association of the History of Religions (IAHR). University of Toronto, Canada. August 16-21, 2010.
  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts. Religion: A Human Phenomenon. XXth World Congress of the International Association of the History of Religions (IAHR). University of Toronto, Canada. August 16-21, 2010.
  • Russell, Y. I., Bjorklund, D. F., Gobet, F., Kiessling, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2010). Developmental trajectory of understanding plants, animals, humanoids, supernatural agents, and invisibility. 2010 Annual Convention of the Canadian Psychological Association, Winnipeg, Canada, June 3–5, 2010.
  • Russell, Y. I. (2010). Social monitoring by reputation: how to compare humans and animals in an evolutionary framework? Primate Society of Great Britain (PSGB) spring meeting, University of Abertay, Dundee, Scotland. April 6–7, 2010.
  • Russell, Y. I., & Gobet, F. (2009). The Affect Grid: methodological and measurement issues of measuring mood repeatedly in the same session. Cognition, Emotion, and Motivation (CEM 09) International Congress. Medina Convention & Expo Centre, Yasmine Hammamet, Tunisia, Nov 3–5, 2009.
  • Kiessling, F., Russell, Y, & Perner, J. (2009). Children’s understanding of invisible agents: Absent, small, or ... invisible ?! Biennial Meeting of the Cognitive Development Society (CDS), San Antonio, Texas, USA, October 16, 2009.
  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2009). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts. Experimental Analysis of Behaviour Group (EABG) Meeting. Department of Psychology, University College London. April 7, 2009.
  • Russell, Y. I., Gobet, F., & Whitehouse, H. (2008). Recall of ‘counterintuitive’ concepts: the effect of pre-training, presentation, and normality of concepts. Recollection Workshop, Institute of Psychology, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, December 18, 2008.
  • Russell, Y. I., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2008). Complexity in chimpanzee grooming cliques: Complex thoughts or simple rules?. International Primatological Society (IPS) XXII Congress, Edinburgh International Convention Centre, Scotland. August 6, 2008
  • Russell, Y. I. (2007). Polyadic grooming among captive chimpanzees.Conference: “Social Organization and Cognitive Tools. General Patterns in Vertebrates?" Konrad Lorenz Forschungsstelle, Grünau, Austria, February 22-25, 2007.
  • Russell, Y. I., Call, J., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2005) An ‘indirect reputation’ experiment in four great ape species. ASAB (Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour) Summer Conference, Lancaster University, Lancaster, U.K., July 19-21, 2005.
  • Russell, Y. I., Call, J., & Dunbar, R. I. M. (2005) An ‘indirect reputation’ experiment in four great ape species. St Andrews International Conference on Animal Social Learning, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Scotland, June 15-18, 2005.
  • Russell, Y. I. (2004). Third party grooming in a captive chimpanzee group. Primate Society of Great Britain (PSGB) spring meeting, Paignton Zoo, Paignton, U.K., March 29-30, 2004.
  • Ramcharan, L., Russell, Y., Dueck, A., & Wilson, L. (1997). Sweet taste preference in genetically obese mice. Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Science Annual Meeting. University of Manitoba, June 20, 1997. Winnipeg, Canada.
  • Russell, Y. I. (1997) Sweet taste preference in the genetically obese (lepob/lepob) mouse as an indication of altered hedonic response to ingesta. Prairie Undergraduate Conference. University of Winnipeg, April 1997. Winnipeg, Canada.