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InnoPlanta Science Prize for Klümper and Qaim

Göttingen agricultural economists Dr. Wilhelm Klümper and Prof. Dr. Matin Qaim received the InnoPlanta Science Prize 2015 for their work on the economics of genetically modified crops. The Prize is annually awarded by InnoPlanta for objective and publicly visible research work in the wider area of plant biotechnology. In particular, Klümper and Qaim received the prize for their paper 'A meta-analysis of the impacts of genetically modified crops' that was published in the journal 'PLOS ONE' in 2014. The paper had received international mass media attention. The Prize was awarded on 17 November in Berlin during the InnoPlanta-Forum.


Meta-analysis of the impacts of GM crops

Wilhelm Klümper and Matin Qaim have carried out a meta-analysis of the agronomic and economic impacts of GM crops, covering 147 original studies that were carried out internationally over the last 20 years. On average, GM technology adoption has reduced chemical pesticide use by 37%, increased crop yields by 22%, and increased farmer profits by 68%. Yield gains and pesticide reductions are larger for insect-resistant crops than for herbicide-tolerant crops. Yield and profit gains are higher in developing countries than in developed countries. The meta-analysis reveals robust evidence of GM crop benefits. Such evidence may help to gradually increase public trust in this technology. The results were recently published in PLOS ONE. Several large newspapers reported about the results, including The Economist, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, and several others.


Genetically Modified Crops and Food Security

Matin Qaim and Shahzad Kouser from the University of Goettingen have shown in a new study that the introduction of genetically modified (GM) cotton has improved the nutrition situation in India, the country with the largest number of undernourished people worldwide. The researchers have used data from over 500 randomly selected small-farm households, which they had surveyed regularly over a 7-year period. The adoption of GM cotton has increased yields and incomes, enabling farm families to afford more and better food. Calorie consumption and dietary quality have improved significantly. By now, more than 90% of all cotton farms in India have switched to GM technology. As a result, food insecurity was reduced by 15-20% among cotton-growing households. The study was published recently in the academic journal “PLOS ONE” (click here for full text open access).



Agricultural Economists on Bt Cotton Impacts in India

The controversy about Bt cotton impacts in India continues. Recently, India’s Committee on Agriculture released a report stating that Bt cotton would not benefit poor farmers. As a reaction, 65 independent agricultural economists and political scientists prepared a statement in which they criticize the Committee’s report as biased and ignorant of the large scientific evidence on Bt cotton benefits for farmers in India. Supporters of this statement include eminent Indian and international scholars in the field of agricultural development and technology evaluation. The statement was sent to the Indian Prime Minister and Minister of Agriculture.
The statement can be downloaded here




Josef G. Knoll Science Prize for Elisabeth Fischer

Elisabeth Fischer receives the Josef G. Knoll Science Prize 2012 for her doctoral dissertation titled “Determinants and impacts of smallholder collective action in Kenya”, which she recently completed under the guidance of Prof. Matin Qaim. Using primary data and econometric analyses, Fischer showed in her research that farmer groups can improve access to markets and new technologies, thus contributing to higher household incomes. Yet, she also finds that group structure and other institutional details influence outcomes and gender implications significantly. The Josef G. Knoll Science Prize is awarded every two years by the Fiat Panis Foundation for outstanding research related to hunger and poverty reduction.





Jonas Kathage and Prof. Dr. Matin Qaim publish new paper on GM crop impacts in India

Genetically modified (GM) crops are often criticized, but a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) finds that at least one such crop—cotton engineered to resist a common insect pest— has significantly raised the living standards of smallholder farm households in India. Jonas Kathage and Matin Qaim from the University of Goettingen conducted surveys between 2002 and 2008 of 533 households in four principal cotton-producing Indian states. The sample included farmers who grew the GM crop, called Bt cotton, and those who did not. The former increased cotton yields and profits by 24% and 50% respectively. The researchers attribute the increases to reduced damage from the cotton bollworm. They further determined that household living standard increased by 18% among Bt cotton farmers once the growers realized that the profit gains are sustainable. The benefits even appear to have increased over time. Since most of the farmers are relatively poor, the gains have made a substantial positive impact on their lives. The findings refute an earlier assertion that GM crop technology would harm smallholder farmers due to low and eroding economic benefits. Since Bt cotton is the only such crop that is already widely grown by smallholder farmers, the study may add to the wider public biotechnology debate.
(link to open access article)



German Development Bank awards prizes to Prof. Qaim and Dr. Rao

Professor Matin Qaim was recently awarded the Prize for Excellence in Applied Development Research 2011 by the German Development Bank (KfW) in cooperation with the German Association of Development Economists. Qaim was honored for his outstanding work on the economic impacts of genetically modified crops in developing countries. In a recent paper he showed that, under favorable conditions, such crops cannot only contribute to higher incomes in the small farm sector, but also to better child nutrition in poverty households. The award ceremony took place on 24 June 2011 in Berlin. During the same ceremony, Dr. Elizaphan James O. Rao was awarded one of the three Prizes for Young Scholars in Applied Development Research, which is also sponsored by KfW. Rao received the prize for his outstanding doctoral dissertation, which he recently completed under the guidance of Prof. Qaim. In his dissertation, Rao analyzes how smallholders in Kenya can benefit from the local expansion of supermarket chains.


Prof. Dr. Matin Qaim awarded with Grand DLG-Prize

On 15 December 2010, Prof. Dr. Matin Qaim was awarded the “Grand International DLG-Prize for Scientific Achievements” of the German Agricultural Society (Deutsche Landwirtschaftsgesellschaft – DLG). The prize was presented by the German Federal Minister of Food and Agriculture, Ms. Ilse Aigner, during a ceremonial act in Berlin on the occasion of the 125. anniversary of the foundation of DLG. Professor Qaim received the prize for his outstanding and policy-relevant research contributions on global food security and technological innovation in smallholder agriculture. (Press release in German)



Funding for GlobalFood Program approved by DFG

On November 26, the German Research Foundation (DFG) has approved the Research Training Group (RTG) “GlobalFood” and associated funding for a first phase of 4.5 years. The RTG will start in April 2011. GlobalFood combines excellent research in agricultural and development economics with innovative training concepts for doctoral and postdoctoral researchers. This is a joint initiative between the University of Göttingen and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Prof. Dr. Matin Qaim is director and speaker of GlobalFood. (www.uni-goettingen.de/globalfood)



Prof. Qaim comments on TV Documentary “Hunger”

On 25 October 2011, the German TV channel ARD showed a documentary with the title “Hunger”, in which certain aspects were reported incorrectly. Prof. Qaim commented on this in a letter to the ARD Program Director, in which he also demands that agricultural scientists should be featured more prominently in media pieces related to the topics of hunger and the role of new agricultural technologies for food security. Qaim’s letter, which is in German language, can be downloaded
here



Prof. Qaim appointed to the Scientific Advisory Board for Agricultural Policy at the German Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture, and Consumer Protection (BMELV)

Prof. Dr. Matin Qaim has recently been appointed as member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Agricultural Policy at the German Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture, and Consumer Protection (BMELV). The Board consists of up to 15 members from different scientific disciplines, who advise the Ministry on strategic issues in the areas of agricultural policy and rural development.





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