Ecosystem Modelling
Schrift vergrößern Schrift verkleinernBarrierefreie Version
Search | Deutsch
Katrin Meyer 206

Contact:

Dr. Katrin Meyer
Department of Ecosystem Modelling
Büsgen-Institut
Georg-August-University of Göttingen

Büsgenweg 4
37077 Göttingen, Germany
Fon: +49 (0)551 39-33795
Email: Katrin.Meyer*forst.uni-goettingen.de







The ecological consequences of individual-level variation across scales


Research Interests:

Terrestrial ecology
ecological concepts in micro- and macroecology, individual interactions, savanna ecology, cyclical succession, multitrophic interactions, above-belowground interactions, plant behaviour, bacterial interactions in the phyllosphere, tropical ecology

Individual-based modelling
simulation modelling with C++ and NetLogo, population viability analysis, scaling-up, combined empirical-modelling approaches, pattern-oriented modelling, sensitivity analysis, comparison bottom-up and top-down modelling approaches

Spatial ecology
patch dynamics, spatial root and shoot competition, grid-based modelling, spatial statistics


CV

2009 - Lecturer, Göttingen University
2006 - 2008 Postdoc, NIOO-KNAW, Netherlands
2003 - 2006 PhD, Jena University
2000 - 2001 Student, Imperial College London
1997 - 2003 Diploma in Biology, Marburg University


Awards

2012 Campusemerge, 1st prize
2012 Goettingen Award for Forest Ecosystems Research


Projects:

My past and present projects investigate the consequences of individual-level variation or ecological patterns at larger spatial, temporal, and organizational scales [16,17,21]:

Climate change-induced invasionsLong-distance dispersal - the key to invasive success?
Under climate change, the invasion success of range-shifting plants may depend on the relative dispersal capacities of the potential invaders and their enemies. We developed a scale-explicit model where population dynamics emerged from individual interactions in a field-scale grid of a few hectares and was extrapolated to a regional-scale grid covering transeuropean temperature gradient. We found that long-distance dispersal can be the key to the invasive success of range-expanding plants under climate change, but only if 'guerilla' plants are not impeded by fast enemies [Meyer et al. in revision].
> PhD student Janina Radny
> MSc thesis Mijke van Oorschot ("cum laude")
> MSc thesis Tanja Gerbershagen (ongoing)
> in cooperation with Wim van der Putten, Netherlands Institute of Ecology NIOO-KNAW, The Netherlands, and Katja Tielbörger, University of Tübingen, Germany
> funded by the German Research Foundation DFG


Bacteria on leafEcological concepts and bacterial individuality in the phyllosphere
A few ecological concepts and theories such as the niche or island biogeography theory have been applied to bacterial communities on leaf surfaces, but there is scope for many more such tests of macroecological concepts in microbiomes such as the phyllosphere [22]. The phyllosphere is also highly suitable to investigate bacterial interactions across spatial and organizational scales.
> PhD student Daniel Esser
> BSc thesis Anna Hille
> in cooperation with Johan Leveau, University of California at Davis, USA, and Netherlands Institute of Ecology NIOO-KNAW, The Netherlands
> funded by the Dutch research foundation NWO and the German Research Foundation DFG (subproject in RTG 1644)


RainForestMarginSulawesiIntegrated modelling of land-use changes in Indonesia
In these projects, we develop and analyze integrated models of land-use change at rainforest margins [24, 27] and in transformation systems in Indonesia. We model the gradient of land-use types from natural and logged forest to agroforestry and transformed systems such as oil palm plantations. A grid-based ecological model is complemented by a socio-economic, agent-based model component that simulates the dynamics of individual households. Overall, the model analyses will improve our understanding of ecological and socio-economic trade-offs under land-use change.
> Postdocs Claudia Dislich and Rodolphe Sabatier
> PhD student Elisabeth Hettig
> MSc thesis Andreas Spangenberg (ongoing)
> in cooperation with Kerstin Wiegand and Jann Lay
> funded by the German Research Foundation DFG (Subprojects in ELUC and CRC 990)


NIOO-GreenhouseHigher trophic levels can influence plant biomass
Our individual-based community simulation model ABBE showed that interactions between a crop plant, its herbivores, and higher trophic levels were stronger belowground than aboveground and that higher trophic levels indirectly affected plant biomass [13]. We also show that simulating experiments based on experimental data from the greenhouse can help to overcome sample size constraints of empirical studies [12]. This illustrates the importance of intense collaboration between empiricists and modellers in above-belowground interactions research [10, 25]. ABBE was also used to assess the relative importance of above- and belowground multitrophic interactions for plant performance along a gradient from natural to agricultural conditions. Belowground interactions were more important towards natural conditions and aboveground interactions more towards crops [23]. A parallel greenhouse experiment highlighted the importance of rare species [18] and the influence of nematodes on aphid-plant interactions [26].
> in cooperation with Wim van der Putten, Wolf Mooij, Matthijs Vos, and Gera Hol, Netherlands Institute of Ecology NIOO-KNAW, The Netherlands
> funded by the Dutch Research Foundation NWO

SavannaSavannas got rhythm
To test patch dynamics as a new scale-explicit mechanism for tree-grass coexistence in savannas at the patch level, we developed the spatially explicit grid- and individual-based SAvanna paTCH MOdel SATCHMO [6]. The exceptional strength of this model is its successful validation against empirical field data [1,5,8]. Cyclical successions of trees and grasses consistently emerged from the SATCHMO simulations, supporting the applicability of patch-dynamics to savannas [5,6,9,11,15]. To complement our model, we have combined and analysed several techniques from spatial statistics [19] to derive a new scale-crossing method for the determination of patch size in vegetation ecology [4].
> in cooperation with Kerstin Wiegand at Jena University, Germany, and David Ward at University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
> funded by the German Research Foundation DFG and the Volkswagen Foundation

CrayfishCrayfish are likely to go extinct
To assess the viability noble crayfish populations, we developed an individual-based simulation model including age-dependent mortalities. We scaled individual interactions up to population-level extinction patterns. The simulations yielded low mean times to extinction. The sensitivity analysis provided evidence against the established view that the noble crayfish is a K-strategist [3].
> in cooperation with Roland Brandl and Knut Gimpel at Marburg University, Germany

Berberis vulgarisPlants show complex behaviour
Using a pattern-oriented simulation model, we demonstrated complex plant behaviour mediated by seed abortion in Berberis vulgaris [28]. Mortality of individual seeds was scaled up to fruit type distribution patterns.
> in cooperation with Hans-Hermann Thulke and Harald Auge at the Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research UFZ, Leipzig, Germany
> funded by the Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research UFZ

My work at Göttingen University is also funded by the Cluster of Excellence "Functional Biodiversity Research".

My Researcher-ID: E-6839-2013

Publications:

28. Meyer, K.M., Soldaat, L.L., Auge, H. & Thulke, H.-H. (2014) Adaptive and selective seed abortion reveals complex conditional decision making in plants. American Naturalist 183, 376-383, DOI 10.1086/675063.

27. Sabatier R., Wiegand K., Meyer K. (2013) Effects of two extreme types of management strategies on production and robustness of a Cacao agroecosystem. PLoS One, http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0080352.

26. Hol, W.H.G., de Boer, W., Termorshuizen, A.J., Meyer, K.M., Schneider, J.H.M., van der Putten, W.H. & van Dam, N.M. (2013) Heterodera schachtii nematodes interfere with aphid-plant relations on Brassica oleracea. Journal of Chemical Ecology 39, 1193-1293.

25. Jeltsch, F., Blaum, N., Brose, U., Chipperfield, J.D., Clough, Y., Farwig, N., Geissler, K., Graham, C.H., Grimm, V., Hickler, T., Huth, A., May, F., Meyer, K.M., Pagel, J., Reineking, B., Rillig, M.C., Shea, K., Schurr, F.M., Schröder, B., Tielbörger, K., Weiss, L., Wiegand, K., Wiegand, T., Wirth, C. & Zurell, D. (2013) How can we bring together empiricists and modellers in functional biodiversity research? Basic and Applied Ecology 14, 93-101.

24. Sabatier, R., Meyer, K.M., Wiegand, K. & Clough, Y. (accepted) Non-linear effects of pesticide application on biodiversity-driven ecosystem services and disservices in a cacao agroecosystem: a modeling study. Basic and Applied Ecology 14, 115-125.

23. Meyer, K.M., Vos, M., Mooij, W.M., Hol, W.H.G., Termorshuizen, A.J. & van der Putten, W.H.G. (2012) Testing the paradox of enrichment along a land use gradient in a multitrophic aboveground and belowground community. PLoS One 7, http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0049034.

22. Meyer, K.M. & Leveau, J.H.J. (2012) Microbiology of the phyllosphere: a playground for testing ecological concepts. Oecologia 168, 621–629.

21. Scherber, C., Lavandero, B., Meyer, K.M., Perovic, D., Visser, U., Wiegand, K. & Tscharntke, T. (2012) Scale effects in biodiversity and biological control: methods and statistical analysis. In: Gurr, G.M., Wratten, S.D., Snyder, W.E., Read, D.M.Y. (eds) Biodiversity and Insect Pests: Key Issues for Sustainable Management. John Wiley & Sons.

20. Hol, W.H.G., Meyer, K.M. & van der Putten, W.H. (2011) Idiosyncrasy in ecology - What's in a word? Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 9, 431-433.

19. Schleicher, J., Meyer, K.M., Wiegand, K., Schurr, F.M. & Ward, D. (2011) Disentangling facilitation and seed dispersal from environmental heterogeneity as mechanisms generating associations between savanna plants. Journal of Vegetation Science 22, 1038-1048.

18. Hol, W.H.G., de Boer, W., Termorshuizen, A.J., Meyer, K.M., Schneider, J.H.M., van Dam, N.M., van Veen, J.A. & van der Putten, W.H. (2010) Reduction of rare soil microbes modifies plant-herbivore interactions. Ecology Letters 13, 292-301.

17. Meyer, K.M., Jopp, F., Münkemüller, T., Reuter, H. & Schiffers, K. (2010) Crossing scales in ecology. Special Feature, Basic and Applied Ecology 11, 561-562.

16. Meyer, K.M., Schiffers, K., Münkemüller, T., Schädler, M,.Calabrese, J.M., Basset, A., Breulmann, M., Duquesne, S., Hidding, B,.Huth, A., Schöb, C. & van de Voorde, T.F.J. (2010) Predicting population and community dynamics - the type of aggregation matters. Basic and Applied Ecology 11, 563-571.

15. Meyer, K.M., Wiegand, K. & Ward, D. (2010) Spatially explicit modelling of savanna processes. In: Hill, M.J. & Hanan, M.P. (eds) Ecosystem Function in Savannas: Measurement and Modeling at Landscape to Global Scales. Taylor & Francis.

14. Moustakas, A., Wiegand, K., Meyer, K.M., Ward, D. & Sankaran, M. (2010) Learning new tricks from old trees: revisiting the savanna question. Frontiers of Biogeography 2, 47-53.

13. Meyer, K.M., Vos, M., Mooij, W.M., Hol, W.H.G., Termorshuizen, A.J., Vet, L.E.M. & van der Putten, W.H. (2009) Quantifying the impact of above- and belowground higher trophic levels on plant and herbivore performance by modeling. Oikos 118, 981-990.

12. Meyer, K.M., Mooij, W.M., Vos, M., Hol, W.H.G., van der Putten, W.H. (2009) The power of simulating experiments. Ecological Modelling 220, 2594-2597.

11. Meyer, K.M., Wiegand, K. & Ward, D. (2009) Patch dynamics integrate mechanisms for savanna tree-grass coexistence. Basic and Applied Ecology 10, 491-499.

10. Van der Putten, W.H., Bardgett, R.D., de Ruiter, P.C., Hol, W.H.G., Meyer, K.M., Bezemer, T.M., Bradford, M.A., Christensen, S., Eppinga, M.B., Fukami, T., Hemerik, L., Molofsky, J., Schädler, M., Scherber, C., Strauss, S.Y., Vos, M. & Wardle, D.A. (2009) Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground-belowground ecology. Oecologia 161, 1–14.

9. Moustakas, A., Sakkos, K., Wiegand, K., Ward, D., Meyer, K.M. & Eisinger, D. (2009) Are savannas patch-dynamic systems? A landscape model. Ecological Modelling 229, 3576-3588.

8. Meyer, K.M., Ward, D., Wiegand, K. & Moustakas, A. (2008) Multi-proxy evidence for competition between savanna woody species. Perspect. Plant Ecology Evolution and Systematics 10, 63-72.

7. Moustakas, A., Wiegand, K., Getzin, S., Ward, D., Meyer, K.M., Guenther, M. & Mueller, K.-H. (2008) Spacing patterns of an Acacia tree in the Kalahari over a 61-year period: How clumped becomes regular and vice versa. Acta Oecologica 33, 355-364.

6. Meyer, K.M., Wiegand, K., Ward, D. & Moustakas, A. (2007) SATCHMO: A spatial simulation model of growth, competition, and mortality in cycling savanna patches. Ecological Modelling 209, 377-391.

5. Meyer, K.M., Wiegand, K., Ward, D. & Moustakas, A. (2007) The rhythm of savanna patch dynamics. Journal of Ecology 95, 1306-1315.

4. Meyer, K.M., Wiegand, K., Ward, D. & Moustakas, A. (2007) Determining patch size. African Journal of Ecology 46, 440-442.

3. Meyer, K.M., Gimpel, K. & Brandl, R. (2007) Viability analysis of endangered crayfish populations. Journal of Zoology 273, 364-371.

2. Moustakas, A., Guenther, M., Wiegand, K., Mueller, K.-H., Ward, D., Meyer, K.M. & Jeltsch, F. (2006) Long-term mortality patterns of the deep-rooted Acacia erioloba: The middle class shall die! Journal of Vegetation Science 17, 473-480.

1. Meyer, K.M., Ward, D., Moustakas, A. & Wiegand, K. (2005) Big is not better: small Acacia mellifera shrubs are more vital after fire. African Journal of Ecology 43, 131-136.