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Latin Philology of the Middle Ages and the Modern Era (B.A.) (two subjects)

Programme name: Latin Philology of the Middle Ages and the Modern Era (B.A.) (two subjects)
Degree: Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)
Standard period of study: 6 semesters
Start: Only winter semester
Language requirements before beginning studies: Verification of intermediate Latin knowledge (Kleines Latinum)
Language of the programme: German

Admission to the summer semester 2018:

  • 1st subject semester: start of studies in the winter semester only
  • 2nd to 6th subject semester: open admission (enrolment without previous application)
  • International applicants (non-EU): start of studies in the winter semester only (application to International Student Office)

Subject description
Latin Philology of the Middle Ages and the Modern Era deals with the monumental Latin literature that originated in the period from 500 to 1800. Since many of the texts belonging to this literature are not available in printed form, rather only in medieval handwriting, the subject also concentrates on paleography (the study of ancient writings) and codicology (study of ancient manuscripts). .

Latin Philology of the Middle Ages and the Modern Era includes the resumption and processing of ancient literature on the one hand. On the other hand, it provides the significant models up into the 18th centruy for the vernacular literature and literature in the national language of Europe that originated at the same time. In addition, up into the Early Modern period, Latin is the language of many sources related to historical science (certificates, chronicles etc.).

For these reasons, the subject Latin Philology of the Middle Ages and Modern Era has - within the humanities and cultural sciences - unique potential to cooperate and network with its numerous neighbouring disclines (Classical Philology, German Philology, Romance Philology, English Philolog, Scandianvian Philology, Philolsophy, Theology, Art History, Musicology, History of the Natural Sciences, historical science research of the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Early Modern Period.).

Teaching and research in the area of Latin Philology of the Middle Ages and Modern Era at the University of Göttingen has a long tradition. Göttingen, along with Munich and Berlin, is one of the three oldest locations in Germany with this discipline: Wilhelm Meyer from Speyer was the first to continually represent this subject in the years 1895 to1917; his successors in teaching were Hans Walther, Paul Gerhard Schmidt, Fidel Rädle and, as of 2002, Thomas Haye.

As of April 2005 Latin Philology of the Middle Ages and Modern Era is an independent department within the Göttingen Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Within this teaching and research coalition, the subject is involved in joint activities in the area of the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period. At the same time, the bridge subject Latin Philology of the Middle Ages and Modern Era provides important services for the neighbouring disciplines by procuring palaeographic, codiologic and linguistic knowledge.

    Research foci of the subject in Göttingen
  • Literature and history of education in the high and late middle ages
  • Humanism and reformation in Germany
  • History of genre
  • Rhetoric
  • Historical communication

Language requirements
Verification of the Latinum during the course of study is required.

Possible subject combinations
Suitable additional subjects in the double-subject programme are above all neighbouring subject from the field of mediavistics (philologies such as German, English or Romance Studies, additionally history, philosophy, among others); a combination with Classical Philology is also suggested.

Programme structure
After an introductory module, which is at the same time the orientation module, a further six thematically different modules must be successfully completed, students may decide on the order of completion is. Students select the suitable seminars, exercises or lectures from the courses offered and/or discuss with a module coordinator the credits to be earned through independent studies, where the programme regulations require it. The programme concludes with the Bachelor's thesis written in one of the two subjects, as the student chooses.

After the basic curriculum, the following profiles may be selected:
A) "Specialised in-depth studies": In addition to the basic subject curriculum, students will take additional modules from the subject. The B.A. thesis must also be written in this subject.
B) "Occupational Qualifications": In addition to the subject-specific studies, students will take courses from other subjects that, in combination with their own subjects, increase their occupational qualifications.
C) "General Studies": In addition to subject-specific studies, students may freely select from a specified array of courses from other subjects.

The cultural, literary and linguistic competencies of the graduates assures them many possibilities on the job market: Out-of-school educational institutions, publishing houses and journalism are possible areas of occupation, but especially libraries, institutes of higher education and non-university research institutes; and the urgently required staff for different DFG long-term projects for cataloguing writings can also be recruited from the graduates. Finally, graduates with the suitable subject combinations may find occupational possibilities in museums, archives and other institutions of documentation.