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The real value of cats and dogs in Germany

It is estimated that 23 percent of all German households have a cat, 19 percent a dog, 6 percent other small animals and 10 percent birds, fish or reptiles. One indication how much these animals are appreciated by their owners is the expenditure they are willing to invest in their hobby. According to a study by Professor Renate Ohr from the University of Göttingen, keeping pets in Germany led to an overall economic demand and added value of around 10.7 billion euros in 2018. This corresponds to almost 0.32 percent of the gross domestic product and is responsible for approximately 210,000 (full-time) jobs. Dog ownership is responsible for about 52 percent and cat ownership about 36.5 percent. more…


The significance of the humanities in the 21st century

Since April 2019, the University of Göttingen has been coordinating a European research team preparing the European part of the World Humanities Report (WHR) for UNESCO. From this summer, the Volkswagen Foundation has supported the project with around 244,000 euros, for one year in the first instance. The WHR provides insights into current developments in the humanities and forms the basis for future UNESCO recommendations. more…


How cows and cattle can get back to the pastures

Modern livestock farming increases the pressure to use arable land for fodder production. The result: modern dairy farms no longer send their cows out to pasture. The "Green Grass" project, led by the University of Göttingen, brings researchers, industry and stakeholders together in an interdisciplinary network stretching across Germany. They are investigating how grazing livestock can be brought back into the landscape and finding new ways of creating sustainable and efficiently managed pasture. more…


Why is Brexit so difficult?

"Why is Brexit so difficult?“ – the University of Göttingen invites you to a public lecture followed by a panel discussion on Tuesday 10 September 2019. The British political scientist Professor Simon Usherwood from the University of Surrey will first try to formulate answers to this central question. Afterwards, participants from Great Britain and Germany will discuss the practical consequences of Brexit on a personal level. more…


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Further news

Males of a feather flock together

"Birds of a feather flock together" or rather "opposites attract"? A recently published study on male macaques in Thailand speaks for the former: behavioural biologists from the German Primate Centre and psychologists from the University of Göttingen have observed that the more similar male Assamese macaques are in their personality, the closer they get and the stronger their social bonds. more…

Internationalisation in an increasingly complex world

As part of the "Germany Today" tour organised by the German Academic Exchange Sercive (DAAD), 22 representatives of US and Canadian universities, research institutions and funding organisations visited the University of Göttingen, including representatives of the so-called Ivy League. more…

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