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The University of Göttingen is an internationally renowned research university. Founded in 1737 in the Age of Enlightenment, the University is committed to the values of social responsibility of science, democracy, tolerance and justice. It offers a comprehensive range of subjects across 13 faculties: in the natural sciences, humanities, social sciences and medicine. With about 30,000 students and more than 210 degree programmes, the University is one of the largest in Germany.

New press releases

Digitalisation in the healthcare system

Digitalisation offers enormous opportunities within the healthcare sector. However, in practice, digital instruments often do not meet the expectations of medical staff, who also need to acquire digital skills to handle the instruments properly. In collaboration with project partners, researchers from the University of Göttingen want to develop measures to facilitate the implementation of digital solutions in the healthcare sector and overcome current obstacles.

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Why do(n’t) people support being nudged towards healthier diets?

You may not realise it, but “nudge” has been used by businesses, policy-makers and governments for years to prod the public into making different choices. Small changes in our environment can “nudge” us into different behaviours. For example, printing the low-calorie options in bold on a menu, or showing the calorie information, might change what we choose to eat. But does the public support this? And how do subtleties in how ‘nudge’ interventions are designed affect support, if at all?

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How electron spectroscopy measures exciton “holes”

Semiconductors are ubiquitous in modern technology, working to either enable or prevent the flow of electricity. In order to understand the potential of two-dimensional semiconductors for future computer and photovoltaic technologies, researchers from the Universities of Göttingen, Marburg and Cambridge investigated the bond that builds between the electrons and holes contained in these materials. They were able to gain new insights into charge transfer processes across a semiconductor interface.

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Surprisingly vibrant colour of 12-million-year-old snail shells

Snail shells are often colourful and strikingly patterned due to pigments that are produced in special cells of the snail and stored in the shell. Fossil shells, on the other hand, are usually dull because the pigments are very sensitive and have already decomposed. Residues of ancient colour patterns are therefore very rare, so researchers at Göttingen University and the Natural History Museum Vienna were surprised to discover pigments in twelve-million-year-old fossilised snail shells.

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New pieces in the puzzle of first life on Earth

Microorganisms were the first forms of life on our planet. However, it is still not clear when and where life originated on Earth and when a diversity of species developed in these communities. Researchers led by the University of Göttingen and Linnӕus University have uncovered key findings about the earliest forms of life. In rock samples from South Africa, they found evidence dating to around 3.42 billion years ago that complex microbial communities already existed in the ecosystems at that time.

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How the coronavirus defends itself against our immune system

Covid-19 was the most devastating pandemic of the 21st century. Vaccines and medications have been able to mitigate the course of the disease and contain the pandemic. However, the danger of further outbreaks has not been averted. The virus is constantly mutating, which enables it to infect human cells and multiply more and more effectively. A team led by researchers from Göttingen University has now discovered "protective switches" in the coronavirus that shield it from attacks by the immune system.

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