Human Geography

Dr. Markus Keck

Markus Keck is Assistant Professor in Economic Geography at the University of Göttingen. He graduated in Geography with the minors Cultural Anthropology, Modern History and Political Science from the University of Cologne and received his PhD in 2012 from the University of Bonn for his thesis on the social resilience of food traders in the megacity of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Markus is generally interested in the social science based empirical study of globalized geographies of food in urban and rural settings of the Global South. In so doing, he examines how production, trade, consumption and disposal of food are being changed by contemporary transformations (globalization, urbanization, mechanization, etc.) and what new risks and power asymmetries result from these processes. Currently, Markus is head of a project funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) on the role of knowledge and non-knowledge in the political debate on genetic engineering in Indian agriculture and supervises a couple of doctoral theses in the fields of resource governance and political ecology. In summer 2018, Markus held a position as Visiting Professor of Economic Geography at the University of Frankfurt am Main.

Latest publications (selection)

  • WALLRAPP, C., KECK, M., FAUST, H. (2019): Governing the yarshagumba ‘gold rush’: A comparative study of governance systems in the Kailash Landscape in India and Nepal. In: International Journal of the Commons (accepted)
  • WALLRAPP, C., FAUST, H., KECK, M. (2019): Production networks and borderlands: cross-border yarsagumba trade in the Kailash Landscape. In: Journal of Rural Studies 66 (1): 67-76. doi.org/10.1016/j.jrurstud.2019.01.016
  • GREWER, J., KECK, M. (2019): How one rural community in transition to sustainability overcame its island-status: the case of Heckenbeck, Germany. In: Sustainability 11 (3): 587-604, doi:10.3390/su11030587
  • KECK, M., HUNG, D. (2018): Burn or bury? A comparative cost-benefit analysis of crop residue management practices among smallholder rice farmers in northern Vietnam. In: Sustainability Science (Online first): doi.org/10.1007/s11625-018-0592-z