Research interests

My interdisciplinary research focuses on forest nutrient cycling and greenhouse gas fluxes within the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum and how they are affected by global change processes. With my background in forest soil science and ecology and my training in molecular biochemistry and microbiology, I use an holistic microbial-biogeochemical approach.

We use greenhouse gas concentration measurements (GC-FID and ECD), stable isotope labeling techniques in combination with molecular microbiology tools (DNA/RNA stable isotope probing and next generation sequencing) and measurements of soil physical and chemical properties to identify key microbial groups and community interactions and their controls on nitrogen and methane cycling within the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum at the ecosystem scale at high resolution in space and time.

Ultimately, we will be able to get a mechanistic understanding of how plant-microbe interactions control nitrogen and methane cycling in tropical forest ecosystems and how global change processes may influence these interactions.



 

Education


2011 - Ph.D. in Forest Sciences and Forest Ecology (Soil Science), University of Göttingen, Germany

2008 - M.Sc. in Tropical and International Forestry and Diplom-Forstwirt in Forest Sciences and Forest Ecology (Soil Science), University of Göttingen, Germany

2005 - B.Sc. in Forest Sciences and Forest Ecology (Soil Science), University of Göttingen, Germany


Professional experience

since 2019

Senior Research Scientist and Lecturer; Department of Soil Science of Tropical and Subtropical Ecosystems, Göttingen, Germany

 

2018 – 2019

Lecturer; Department of Soil Science of Temperate Ecosystems, Göttingen, Germany

 

2011 – 2017

Max Planck Postdoctoral Fellow; Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg, Germany

 

2008 – 2011

Research Associate; Department of Soil Science of Tropical and Subtropical Ecosystems, Göttingen, Germany

 

2006 – 2007

Student Research Assistant; Department of Soil Science of Tropical and Subtropical Ecosystems, Göttingen, Germany and University of California, Davis, USA


Publications

Martinson, G. O., Pommerenke, B., Brandt, F. B., Homeier, J., Burneo, J.I., Conrad, R. (2018). Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is the dominant methanogenic pathway in Neotropical tank bromeliad wetlands. Environmental Microbiology Reports 10(1), pp 33-39.

Kanaparthi, D., Reim, A., Martinson G. O., Pommerenke, B., Conrad, R. (2017). Methane emission from feather moss stands. Global Change Biology 23(11), pp. 4884-4895.

Brandt, F. B., Martinson, G. O., & Conrad, R. (2017). Bromeliad tanks are unique habitats for microbial communities involved in methane turnover. Plant and Soil 410(1–2), pp.167–179.

Suleiman, M., Brandt, F.B., Brenzinger, K., Martinson, G.O., Braker, G. (2016). Potential N2O Emissions from the Tanks of Bromeliads Suggest an Additional Source of N2O in the Neotropics. Microbial Ecology 73(4), pp. 751–754.

Brandt, F., Martinson, G. O., Pommerenke, B., Pump, J., Conrad, R. (2015). Drying effects on archaeal community composition and methanogenesis in bromeliad tanks. FEMS Microbiology Ecology 91(2), pp 1-10.

Homeier, J., Leuschner, C., Bräuning, A., Cumbicus, N. L., Hertel, D., Martinson, G. O., Spannl, S., Veldkamp, E. (2013) Effects of increased nutrient addition on the productivity of montane forests and implications for the carbon cycle. In: Bendix, J.,Beck, E., Bräuning, A., Makeschin, F., Mosandl, R., Scheu, S. and Wilcke W. (eds); Ecosystem services, biodiversity and environmental change in a tropical mountain ecosystem of South Ecuador. Ecological Studies Vol. 221, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, pp 297–313. 

Homeier, J., Hertel, D., Camenzind, T., Cumbicus, N. L., Maraun, M., Martinson, G. O., Poma, L. N., Rillig, M. C., Sandmann, D., Scheu, S., Veldkamp, E., Wilcke, W., Wullaert, H. and Leuschner, C. (2012)Tropical Andean forests are highly susceptible to nutrient inputs – Rapid effects of experimental N and P addition to an Ecuadorian montane forest. PLOS ONE 7(10): e47128.

Martinson, G. O., Veldkamp, E., Corre, M. D. (2012) Responses of nitrous oxide fluxes and soil nitrogen cycling to nutrient additions in montane forests along an elevation gradient in southern Ecuador. Biogeochemistry 112(1-3), pp 625-636.

Martinson, G. O., Werner, F. A., Scherber, C., Conrad, R., Veldkamp, E., Flessa, H., Wolf, K., Corre, M. D., Klose, M. and Gradstein, S. R. (2011). Methane emissions from canopy wetlands. ILEAPS Newsletter 11, 33-34. 

Wolf, K., Veldkamp, E., Homeier, J., and Martinson, G. O. (2011), Nitrogen availability links forest productivity, soil nitrous oxide and nitric oxide fluxes of a tropical montane forest in southern Ecuador. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 25(4), GB4009.

Martinson, G. O. (2011). “Canopy wetlands”: A novel source of methane. TMF Newsletter, 11, p10. 

Martinson, G. O., Werner, F. A., Scherber, C., Conrad, R., Veldkamp, E., Flessa, H., Wolf, K., Corre, M. D., Klose, M. and Gradstein, S. R. (2010). Methane emissions from tank bromeliads. Nature Geoscience. 3, 766-769. 

Wullaert, H., Martinson, G. O., Homeier, J., Veldkamp, E., Wilcke, W. (2009). Will nutrient cycles in a tropical montane forest in Ecuador be affected by a changing element composition of rainfall? IOP: Earth and Environmental Science. 6(9).

Paul, S., Martinson, G. O., Veldkamp, E., Flessa, H. (2008). Sample pre-treatment affects the distribution of organic carbon in aggregate fractions of tropical grassland soils. Soil Science Society of America Journal. 72, 500-506.