Elco Luijendijk


Junior lecturer

Department of Structural Geology and Geodynamics, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

CV


Junior Lecturer, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen (2014-present)
Postdoctoral scholar, McGill University (2011-2013)
PhD student, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (2006-2011)
Hydrogeology consultant, ICARDA, Syria (2004-2006)

Research Interests


I study the evolution of fluid flow systems and sedimentary basins on large spatial scales and/or geological timescales. I study these systems by integrating various datasets, such as groundwater isotopes, subsurface temperature and low-temperature thermochronology with a series of existing and newly developed numerical models (see GitHub for some of the codes). I also utilize large-scale geospatial datasets to extrapolate results of groundwater and heatflow models from local to continental scales. I help manage the Geodynamics and Geofluids modelling laboratory

Teaching


M.Geo.239: Fluids in the crust (course description) (syllabus)

Graduate students and student assistants


Sarah Louis (PhD student): Quantifying exhumation and its driving forces in the Molasse Basin
Theis Winter (MSc student): Hydrology and isotope geochemistry of thermal springs in the Alps
Former students & theses

Recent publications


Louis, S., Luijendijk, E., Dunkl, I, Person, M. (2019) Episodic fluid flow in an active fault. Geology, https://doi.org/10.1130/G46254.1


Afsar, F., Luijendijk, E. (2019) Quantifying a critical marl thickness for vertical fracture extension using field data and numerical experiments. Geoscience Frontiers, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gsf.2019.05.008.


Bauer, J.F., Krumbholz, M., Luijendijk, E., Tanner, D.C. (2019) A numerical sensitivity study of how permeability, geological structure, and hydraulic gradient control the lifetime of a geothermal reservoir. Solid Earth Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2019-112.


Luijendijk, E., Gleeson, T., Moosdorf, M. (2019) The flow of fresh groundwater and solutes to the world’s oceans and coastal ecosystems. Nature Communications, in revision, preprint available on EarthArxiv